Record With No Sleeve: A U.S. Pop Yeh Yeh Fan in Search of the Genre’s Untold History

Talk & Presentation by Carl Hamm

Date: 17 August 2014
Time: 5pm
Venue: Independent Archive & Resource Centre, 67 Aliwal Street, Singapore 199942

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Synopsis

Carl Hamm’s love for the music of Malaysia and Singapore in the 60s has been steadily growing ever since he purchased his first vinyl EPs nearly 10 years ago.

Carl prefers to give his radio show audience some background on the often obscure and eclectic music he plays every week on his show in Richmond, VA, USA called “If Music Could Talk”.

The fact that there was no readily available information about these 60s Malaysian pop records led him to take on the mission of finding out who the artists were and what made this short lived music scene possible.

In this talk and presentation, Carl Hamm will discuss the inspiration for his two journeys to Singapore and Malaysia (the first in 2010, and the second one currently in progress) and the results of his quest to document the history of this less widely known musical genre.

Speaker Bio

Carl Hamm is a DJ, radio host, film maker, musician, and self-described culture pusher. His weekly radio program – “If Music Could Talk”, named after a song by the Clash, is focused on bringing cultural diversity to the airwaves in Richmond, Virginia, USA on WRIR 97.3, and the rest of the world via his podcast series by the same name (available on radio4all and iTunes). “Pop Yeh Yeh – Psychedelic Rock from Singapore and Malaysia : 1964-1970,” Hamm’s critically heralded compilation of 1960s Malay pop was released in 2014 on Sublime Frequencies.

He is currently traveling in Singapore and Malaysia to record the history behind 60s Malay Pop (aka Pop Yeh Yeh) from the people who created it, and from the fans who keep it alive.

You can find out more about Carl (aka DJ Carlito) at http://carlhamm.net/

His Pop Yeh Yeh research blog can be found at http://menarigogo.blogspot.com/

Organisers

Presented by Ujikaji

Hosted by Independent Archive & Resource Centre